No worries: Mayan calendar went far past 2012

A discovery in the rubble of a studio for royal scribes with a taste for art should settle down talk of doomsday.  A team of U.S. archeologists excavating the ruins of a Mayan city in remote Guatemala have found calendars discrediting the idea that the Mayans predicted an apocalypse in December 2012.


Writings on the wall of the studio show the Mayans had calendars that went far beyond 2012, the year that popular doomsday culture says the vanished civilization believed the world would end. (More here about the calendars.)  The art find was equally important. Two of the three standing masonry walls of the studio were decorated with a faded mural, including a painting of a seated king with a scepter and wearing blue feathers, intact despite the humidity of the Guatemalan lowlands.  (Images: Tyrone Turner, National Geographic)

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  1. […] No worries: Mayan calendar went far past 2012 (apocalypseart.wordpress.com) […]

  2. […] as a newfound Mayan calendar goes on and on | Religion | Rock Hill Herald Online.Related articlesNo worries: Mayan calendar went far past 2012(apocalypseart.wordpress.com)Mayan art and calendar at Xultun stun […]

  3. […] No worries: Mayan calendar went far past 2012 (apocalypseart.wordpress.com) […]

  4. […] No worries: Mayan calendar went far past 2012 (apocalypseart.wordpress.com) […]

  5. […] Never underestimate the power of reality TV.  The Spike network is running a “Last Family on Earth” competition for a spot in one of the Vivos network’s underground bunkers.  The finale occurs Dec. 21, the date the Mayan civilization allegedly predicted an apocalypse.  (See apocalypse debunked, in this previous post) […]

  6. […] there are jitters about doomsday, whether it’s the Mayan Prophecy (disproved recently, see here) or nuclear proliferation. The column that accompanies Fishel’s artwork is also worth a read, […]

  7. […] there are jitters about doomsday, whether it’s the Mayan Prophecy (disproved recently, see here) or nuclear proliferation. The column that accompanies Fishel’s artwork is also worth a read, […]



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